Sgt. Pepper´s Lonely Hearts Club Band Easter Egg - Say What?

1.Play through last track or fast forward until the end of the song, "A Day In The Life".
2.Wait about 30 seconds.
3.Now some funky gibberish should start playing.
I have no clue what is being said or what the significance of this is either. I just find it funny.
4.Enjoy!!!:-)

User Rating:
3.1
  3.1/10 with 75 votes
Contributed By: Catbarph on 09-17-1999
Reviewed By: Webmaster
Special Requirements: The CD
Please correct this Egg if you see errors.

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Comments

Yeti Brooks writes:
For the record (no pun intended), the "Paul is dead, man, miss him, miss him, miss him" reference is not to be found on Sgt. Pepper's. It's at the end of Lennon's "I'm So Tired," from side two of the White Album. His mumbling at the end of that song, if played backwards, does sound just like that sentence. Try it yourself and try to argue with me. Still, it could be a coincidence, but it's so convincing that one has to wonder. This was recorded after Sgt. Pepper's, but still before Russell Gibb, a DJ in Detroit, made the rumor popular in 1969. In 1968, the Beatles had all the money in the world, and all the drugs, and all the freedom to experiment in the studio with such things. For years, Lennon himself had been poking fun at the people who read too much into his nonsense lyrics and prose - "And Your Bird Can Sing," from Revolver, 1966, was written entirely to confuse these people. So was "I Am The Walrus." So I think it entirely possible that he may have done this intentionally in order to spark such controversy - which still continues thirty-four years after the recording, and twenty-two years after his death! Or it could be a coincidence. As could be the fact that "number nine" from Revolution 9, sounds eerily like "turn me on, dead man" when played backwards. The fact that three syllables can become five when played backwards is bizarre, but true. If you have a four-track tape recorder or the ability to record a wav of this on your computer, try it yourself. And, to respond to Norbert Bendl, it's really not that hard to compose something that makes sense backwards and forwards. It takes a little refining, but it's not impossible. Bach's "crab canons" are amazing musical examples, and it's even easier to do with speech. If you're a young millionare with unlimited time in the best recording studio in the world, and George Martin and Geoff Emerick on your side, anything's possible!
11 of 13 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Servo writes:
Well, if anyome has the CD, you should know what it is. I quote from the the CD booklet thing "...Then, as the coup de grace, there is a few seconds of nonsense Beatle chatter, taped, cut into several pieces and stuck together at random so that, as George Martin says, purchasers of the vinyl album who did not have an auto return would say 'What the hell's that?' and find the curious noise going on and on ad infinitum in the concentric run-out groove..." Now you all know :)
10 of 13 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
njbren1 writes:
On the vinyl recording, most turntables would eject and lift the tone arm before this track would play. This track is also a continuous loop on the vinyl. I have also heard that it contains a high frequency tone to annoy your dog.
7 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
momo777 writes:
If there is a dog whistle in this garbled mess your dogs won't go crazy from it on the CD because a CD only has a frequency range of 20-20k hz.
7 of 9 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
theace writes:
The tone is a 15kilohertz tone, i have the cd version and i can hear it clearly. The range of hearing for humans is 20hertz-20,000 hertz. In actuality you can't hear 20 hertz, and you can't hear 20,000 hertz. Most humans can hear 40 hertz to about 16-17,000 hertz.
4 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Beatle Fan writes:
John Lennon asked that the jibberish be added to the inner groove of the record as a tribute to The Beach Boys album "Pet Sounds" that ends with a train passing a crossing and the barking of Brian Wilson's Dogs.
4 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
EddieG writes:
The reason that Blackburn is mentioned in the song is because when they were writing it, there was an article in the newpaper about some survey which had gone on about the roads in Blackburn.
5 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Aragorn12 writes:
I have been able to understand one thing in the gibberish. Someone says "I never could see any other way" over and over.
5 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
ratty writes:
on the cd version i can hear the high pitched nioise, so it is definitly there, and i have reversed the track and there is no hidden message that i can hear
2 of 2 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Nervous Dog writes:
actually you are all wrong----according to Norman Lewisson's book "The Beatle Sessions" it was a jumble of tape loops and cut up pieces of tape according to engineer Norman Smith---any actual sentences are just a coinky dink --but there is a dog whistle---
3 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Beephph writes:
It says: "I never could speak any other way never could speak any other way never could speak any other way..."
4 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Nick Wright writes:
it is fact cut up tape played backwords and there is also a high pitch sound which is out the range of hearing for humans but not for dogs and does any body know why Blackburn, Lancashire is mentiones in the song i am curious because i live here if so mail me @ nickwright@btinternet.com
1 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Chocopup writes:
John did put it in to annoy your dog, its true.
3 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
T-Mac writes:
George Harrison can't possibly be saying "Carlos Santana." The Sgt. Pepper album was recorded in 1966. Santana didn't become famous until after they appeared at Woodstock in 1969. Their first album came out just before that concert, in early '69.
2 of 3 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
cat eater writes:
i saw on some website that its "we f*** like supermen". if your write this backwards (nem repus ekil ckuf ew) and listen carefully, it sounds like the backwards translation
2 of 3 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
snaggy writes:
I always thought that the phrase sounds like "never to see any other way".
1 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
vjohnson84 writes:
I heard from somewhere that if you play the wierd sounds backwards it says something like:"I will F*** you like superman"...
3 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Fitz_R_Me writes:
I personally have heard that this is a reference to the 'supposed' death of Paul Mccartney. It _DOES_ say, "I never could speak any other way" and it is on the Beatles denying that he died, which was in fact, true. :)
3 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
I hear Paul say "Never could see any underwear" with George singing "Carlos Santana" in the background. If you reverse it, it DOES sound like "We'll f*** you like you're Superman" but with reversed lyrics, anything can come out.
2 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Kevin writes:
the last track is just bits of tape cut up and stuck back together in any old way. then repeated. There is a high pitched sound. John asked for it to be put in just to annoy your dog. By the way, reversed speech can give proper meanings although it has nothing to do with the words said forwards. Its to do with your true thoughts. For more information go to http://www.reversespeech.com
2 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Sgt. Pepper writes:
Actually, Its a real phrase forward, just hard to make out. Listen to the gibberish and listen out for "Monsieur, Monsieur, let's have another one"
1 of 2 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
All that talk about hidden messages in reversed audio tracks is complete rubbish caused by the overimagination of some listeners. It is EXTREMELY unlikely that such a complex thing as an audio wave conatining a logical spoken (or sung) message gives an equal amount of logic when reversed. It may work with short words and a lot of practise, but it's close to impossible to do that with such a long sequence. Even with our modern digital technology it would be extremely difficult to do. Now think of the "stoneage" technology of the time when the album was produced... Simply try it for yourself: Record your voice at the computer and try to say something that makes sense backwards as well as forwards. Good luck...
2 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
It's "He'll F***you like superman" or "will paul come back as superman?" Part of the Paul is dead hoax. The inner groove is on the LP brittish release only and not part of a day in the life. The dog whistle is there if you dont here it than your hearing SUCKS. Any thilg can come out backwards but there are no sentences you hear what you want to hear.
3 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
tom writes:
My friend played this mumbling to me backwards and it sounds like John saying 'Paul is dead miss him, miss him, miss him!
2 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Haha...it could be absolutely nothing and the Beatles are all a bunch of little goof-offs so they may just be messing with us. BUT...rumor has it that it says something like "blism blism blism won dead say laup"...if you would play it in reverse that would be "Paul is dead now. Miss him, miss him, miss him."? I haven't had the chance to check it out, but who knows?
1 of 11 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No


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