Rush Easter Egg - Many More Rush Eggs

1. YYZ is actually the the morse code transponder for Toronto Int. Airport

2. The Trees - was apparently written about the British in Canada, the Oaks being the English and the Maples the oppressed Canadians.

The 12" single of Prime Mover has somewhere a mention (or picture) of every album rush has made up to that ponint

I've loads more if anyone wants them

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Contributed By: Shaun Barry on 12-03-1999
Reviewed By: Webmaster
Special Requirements: copies of the song :)
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Comments

Kipner writes:
1. Well, just a clarification. YYZ is the airport code for Toronto (just as LAX is for Los Angeles), and the intro in "YYZ" on "Moving Pictures" is the morse code for YYZ. Clever and simply brilliant. 2. I don't really believe this explanation, my assumption has always been that it is about socialism (communism) in general, that no one is allowed to be greater (taller in the case of the Oaks) than anyone else. Better to cap such ambitions and make everyone equal instead ("The trees are now kept equal, by hatchet, axe and saw") A lot of this thinking is significant for Neal in his lyrics. //Kipner
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the serf writes:
The percussion intro to YYZ is y y z in morse code.
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WoodyTX writes:
Rush were (are) huge fans of the author Ayn Rand. Her first novel, "Anthem" (interesting name...) is mirrored by the storyline in 2112, and her concepts influence many of their earlier songs. Her writings are about individualism and its conflict with socialism. The Trees is an allegory of the same idea. There are those who will succeed in life. There are those who will not. The ones who do not succeed often have the successful ones brought down to their level by the force of law. Equality through force.
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Cinaed writes:
There is also a theory that the song was written about the relationship between the province of Quebec and the rest of Canada, and how Quebec appeared to not be "happy in their shade". At the time the song was released Quebec separation was quite an issue, and still is. Hmmmmmm....
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tomhowand8 writes:
there may be a very detailed explanation for the trees. perhaps neil has explained it in an interview somewhere. probably, though, it is merely an allegory about subjugation/oppression in general. it could fit any number of situations throughout history. the maples forming a union is rather interesting, though, which does lend credence to the labor idea.
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While any poetry is open to individual interpretation, I've always thought the characterizations in the song "The Trees" was about the whole of the human race. I see it as a representation of the class struggle. In the end, whether you are rich or poor, famous or anonymous, powerful or powerless, ruler or ruled upon, you will all be cut down by death. The trees (people) are all kept equal by hatchet, ax and saw (no matter what you're going to die)! Brilliant song!
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necirgrad writes:
I always thought The Trees was about labor disputes. Maybe I'm goin' nuts.
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Hudman writes:
On the Moving Pictures cd, listen to the song "Through the Camera Eye" and listen closely and at some point you will hear Geddy Lee burp and then say "Oh my God!"
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rrmab writes:
Woody, cross out the "are" and stick with "were." They've said many times they only agreed with her thoughts on artistic freedom, not her politics. Peart has distanced himself more and more from her over the years. In 1 of his books (Traveling Music, IIRC) he sums up the subject with "I was young and naive." Anyway, one interpretation I have is maybe the trees (as a metaphor for people of course) should stop their petty bickering amongst themselves and watch out for any REAL enemies who will destroy both sides. I also recall Peart saying it wasn't meant to be a real serious song. He could be lying tho. ;) @Hudman - Um, no. It's Neil saying "'ello" and Ged replies with "Hello, guv." or perhaps it's "Hello old duff." I'm still not sure which. The title is just "The Camera Eye." "Through The Camera Eye" was a VHS video compilation. Dave R. - that book's been out of print forever. I'll reserve further comments on it. There have been at least 3 more books on Rush since then. Somehow I suspect you're a friend of the author giving him a plug.
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xaurtmj writes:
And all this time I'd thought "the oaks" were supposed to represent the United States...
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Dave R. writes:
I must recommend RUSH VISIONS: The Official Biography by Bill Banasiwicz. It goes up to the recording of Hold Your Fire. I don't know of any recent books since I haven't been keeping up with Rush since the release of Test For Echo. Anyway, it does cover the origins of a lot of their songs.
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Lerxst writes:
So you're saying that we shouldn't miss the forest for the trees, eh?
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Silk1976 writes:
I think you're both reading too much into it.. From what I hear, Neil Peart simply saw a cartoon where an oak and a maple were arguing, and he thought it humorous if trees were really able to do such a thing. I dont think he wrote the lyrics with any intent of showing one group being oppressed, but if thats what you get out of it, thats fine by me - I just think the origin was simpler then that :)
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