Orwell, George Easter Egg - Pen Name

"George Orwell" was a pen name for socialist "Eric Blair"

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Contributed By: Prince Mu-Chao on 09-03-1999
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Comments

Muff writes:
Eric Blair chose the name George Orwell because he lived close (or he had some particular attachment) to the River Orwell in Suffolk, UK and chose George because that is England's patron Saint.
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Oli writes:
George Orwell’s real name was indeed Eric Blair, as everybody who has ever studied English literature knows. He used because he didn't think his first book was any good and he wanted to make sure that if it did not get good reviews he would still be able to use his real name on another book. It also stopped his family finding out what he was up too as they disapproved of writing as a career. However his first book like all the others was so successful he was keep using it.
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dysprosia writes:
Orwell *was* a socialist! The depictions within 1984 were warnings against totalitarian regimes. Orwell did support democratic socialism. The book was written around the time of Hitler and Stalin, and was then a good polemic and warning for the times
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Storme writes:
The book "Animal Farm" by George Orwell (which, by the way, was just a retelling of the Russian Revolution) was not saying that everyone should be socialist. Instead, it showed how the leaders in the war (example: Snowbell=Stahlen) destroyed the idea of 'Animalism' (obviously meaning socialism) because they took the best for themselves instead of distributing it equally, like the government is supposed to do.
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charliehodge writes:
This is NOT a real eegg. It is mentioned on every single book he ever wrote.
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Alisdair writes:
Probably the first fact that comes to mind for most people about Orwell,the man,is that his real name was Eric Blair.This is NOT an egg.Instead,look for why he picked the year 1984-it's a transposition of the numbers in the year 1948 when he wrote/completed(opinions differ) the novel.Further and deeper Easter eggs lie within "Newspeak",so get reading!
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denny writes:
Socialist is also one of the themes of his book "Animal Farm", about farm animals who form a revolution against the farmer and form their own government, which I believe is Socialist.
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monty python writes:
a pen name is not an eegg. if it was there would be thousands of names all saying that "so-and-so's name is actually blahdyblah..." and so on.
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cath writes:
just to clear up the comment from whoever it was who wrote about why orwell used the year 1984 - the book was originally going to be called 1980, but it took him 4 years to complete the book. for each year it took for him to write, he would add another onto the title, thus 1984.
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Stheg writes:
Pen names shouldn't be considered eeggs - unless the author is famous in some other respect. As for 1984, the only eegg-like thing about it is many of the Inner Party characters were thinly disgused real-life Soviets. Big Brother was Stalin, Goldberg was Trotsky, etc. Although Orwell was a Socialist, as were most British intellectuals from 1890's - 1970's, he despised the Communists and never missed a chance to criticize them. BTW, McCarthy didn't start is anti-communist campaign until 1950, two years after 1984 was published.
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Yammq writes:
All right, you said that is was a pen name for socialist Eric Blair. Fine with me, but are you sure he was a socialist? In 1984, IngSoc, meaning English Socialism, was depicted as a negative utopia, which is not exactly a good thing. It doesn't seem likely that a socialist would want to present socialism in that manner. It would be like, say, a Christian in 30 C.E. (Common Era, but same time line as A.D.) shouting to have Jesus thrown up on the cross, then grabbing a pike and ramming it into the man he loves.
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Why bother writes:
George Orwell was a Socialist during the Spanish Civil War. He became disillusioned after seeing the effects of the war and therefore rejected socialism.
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Blair was a socialist. 1984 is about macarthyism, a movement in the US government that lead to the creation of the house UnAmerican Activities commity, he used the name Insoc because socialism as he saw it was different from Stalin's Socialism, which was communism. the story about him becmoing "Disillusioned" was created by the US government back when the book was banned in several states. The house Unamerican Activities commity was essentially a secret police force that was eventually absorbed by the CIA, and it's practices, name and purpose changed. Essentially, it no longer exists.
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Rosey writes:
Actually, I read that he admired Orson Wells, also a famous author, and he sort of took Orson's name(s) And made himself a last name. Orwell. Orson Wells, Orwell.. I think it was Orsen wells.. or theres another one, H.G. Wells.. Orson someone.. i'm sure it was one of those two
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Look, okay? Blair was writing about the Macarthyist movement, not because of becoming "Disallusioned". The Macarthyists wanted to monitor all people 24/7. Ingsoc was because Blair Disliked how communism often mascaraded as socialism. The Dissalusioning story was made up by the Americans because they wanted to use it as anti-capitalist propaganda during the 1960s. A Heavily Edited copy of 1984 was used for this purpose during the cold war.
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