King, Stephen Easter Egg - King's References to His Other Books -- Even Unpublished Ones!

Much has been written here about how Stephen King likes to make sly references in his works to books that he has previously published. But in Gerald's Game (1992), King got REALLY sly by referring to events in Dolores Claiborne, which wasn't published until the next year!

Take a look at the Viking first edition of Gerald's Game on pages 166 and 167: The main character, in a flashback to an incident of sexual abuse in her childhood, hears a voice telling her "The other woman is on her knees too, and she smells that same smell. That smell that's like copper and cream. --- It's coming out of the well. The smell is coming out of the well. --- She made him fall down the well."

Now look at the Viking first edition of Dolores Claiborne on pages 183 and 184, in which the title character (who gets rid of her husband by letting him fall into a well) has a vision of the Gerald's Game character being sexually abused. Then on page 200, Dolores Claiborne shares the same vision which prior novel describes: "I think she SAW me. --- [S]he'd realized someone was lookin at her, that a woman God knows how many miles away but still in the path of the eclipse--a women who'd just killed her husband--was lookin at her."

Be sure to pay attention when you're reading Hearts in Atlantis. You might just get a sneak preview of King's NEXT book!

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Contributed By: Slyke on 10-10-1999
Reviewed By: Webmaster
Special Requirements: Copies of Gerald's Game and Dolores Claiborne
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Comments

fall0ut writes:
In his latest book, Dreamcatcher, there is a major plot point when the alien, Mr. Gray, drives to Derry's watertower to poison it. It turns out the water tower is not there anylonger due to a flash flood that destroyed. My point here is this: When Mr. Gray, who is inside Jonsey's body, runs to the cement wehre the watertower used to be and written in crimson ink is PENNYWISE LIVES. Pennywise is the clown from IT. This might be a signifier that there might be a sequel to IT coming up soon. Or it is just something Stephen King threw in there.
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Shannon_1222 writes:
My favorite cross reference of Stephen King's is in The Tommyknockers. The two teenagers have to drive into Derry to get more batteries for the alien town to survive and as they are driving back the boy thinks he is hallucinating when he sees a Clown in a manhole (It).
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Big Ern writes:
in the book IT, when William Hanlon is telling Mike about the fire at the black spot, he mentions that the mess cook Dick Halloran saves his life. if you remember, Dick Halloran was the cook at the overlook from the shining
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Bill writes:
One of my favorite cross-links between King novels was between 'The Dead Zone' and 'Cujo'. In 'The Dead Zone', the main character is approached by a rural Maine sherriff to help solve a local murder. Turns out that the murderer was a member of the town's police force named Frank Dodd, who ended up committing suicide rather than getting caught. 'Cujo' is set in a nearby Maine town. Early in the book, we learn that some of the parents in town use Frank Dodd as their local equivalent of the boogeyman: "Eat your peas or Frank Dodd will get you." Not really an egg, but spooky as heck. This habit of King's to reference other novels of his really helps establish atmosphere for his regular readers.
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kallisto writes:
It is actually a long term goal that Stephen King has had to pull ALL of his "places" together. Ever since the original The Stand was published he had a dream to pull every story from the Langoliers to Sun Dog to the Regulators all into the World he has created in The Stand and The Dark Tower Series. These are the two main focal points. If you want to see what HE (Stephen King) means read the ORIGINAL The Stand (uncut) and the Dark Towers series in order. The Wizard (last Dark Tower book) really pulls it all together for the readers (you see Flag(from the Stand) as the Dark Man) He stated that he will start to write the new book this month (Jan -01) YEAH!!!!!! and it will pull it together even more. This was all revealed in an interview I saw on I think A&E or something and his official Website.
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beercoat writes:
In the TommyKnockers when Gard wakes up hungover on the beach he has a conversation with Jack the boy from The Talisman which of course King wrote with Peter Straub.
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Jadzia writes:
I haven't seen Dreamcatcher, but IT is my favorite Stephen King novel. I find it interesting that the alien in Dreamcatcher is named "Mr. Gray", because in IT, Pennywise the clown's real name was Robert Gray.
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scruffycat writes:
Jade, went out and bought Pet Sematary. Near the start Crandall (the older nieghbour) tells Louis "Lot of rabies in Maine now. There was a big old St Bernard went rabid downstate a couple of years ago and killed four people." Unfortunately i've never read Cujo so I still need to know if its the events in that book that are being referred to.
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Egg HEad writes:
In Dreamcatcher. About halfway through the book, Jonesy/ Mr Grey come across a memorial stone. Inscribed on the stone are the names of about 6 or 7 people who are part of "The Losers Club" In paint underneath is the phrase PENNYWISE LIVES Both the names of the group of people, the name of the club and the name Pennywise are references to the main characters and monster in Stephen Kings IT.
20 of 24 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Yes, in IT, when Henry Bowers escapes, he is picked up by Christine. The "thing" driving the car is one of Henry's friends, who is also drinking Desert Driver, which is what all the "bag guys" in Christine drank. For anyone who is as interested as I am in the Dark Tower series, go to www.darktowercompendium.com.
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dmsmith writes:
One that seems to have escaped notice... There has been multiple mentions of the fact that in the Darktower series Roland is chasing the Dark Man (Flagg the Walkin' dude). However, in either the first or second Darktower books (I think the first but can't remember for sure) Roland crosses paths with two guys chasing a demon. Those who have read Eyes of the Dragon will recognise this encounter, the two guys are the two from that book who set out at the end after the bad guy... yep you guessed it.. Flagg!
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Petrodon writes:
I like how King links theme's over several books. One of note is how the Leland Gaunt in Needful Things and Randall Flagg in The Stand (supposedly both servants of the devil) use the exact same expression; "Rome wasn't built in a day, and neither was Akron, Ohio." That was cool.
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Evilash writes:
First off I just want to say that King is god. Now for refences to his other books I love the fact that in IT there are numerouse refences to the Turtle. The turtle is one of the guardians of the beam. It is also interesting to note that in the black house they are kidnapping kids based on their ability to break the beam. As you may already know the old man in the first story in hearts in atlantis also has this ability that is why he is being chased. If you dont already know the beam is what holds all of kings worlds and the tower it self that serves as the axel that all the worlds connect to. God i love King.
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#8 writes:
There's loads of little snippets in Kings books - In Insomnia, when Ralph and Louis go into Atropos' den, there's mention of a sneaker which belonged to Gage, who was in Pet Cemetery.
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Mel writes:
My favourite cross moment in King books comes from "The Talisman". While the main character is traveling across the US by flipping back and forth between two worlds, he flips into Maine. He's only there for a moment, but it's long enough to notice some balloons floating up and out of a open man hole in the road. This one sent shivers up my spine. "The Talisman" established that in King's universe there are various realities or 'worlds', which is probably why the next part of that story (soon to be released) can be called a Dark Town book. I think it was the first Dark Tower that explained the tower acts as an axis point for all worlds, which are connected by 'beams'. The destruction of these beams mentioned in "Hearts of Atlantis" brings this one into the fold as well. Another point of interest - the Dark Tower books are obviously based on the Robert Browning poem "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came". Remember that King was an English teacher until "Carrie" made it big. Copies of this poem are found all over the Internet, if anyone's interested. Mel.
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Graen writes:
Here's one that I bet a lot of you didn't catch at first. If you read through The Gunslinger, in the first couple of pages, there's a reference to Roland being "The kind of man that would straighten bad pictures in strange hotel rooms." In the newest book, Everything's Eventual, King included the story "1408". The story is about a man who pays a visit to the haunted room 1408, and the first thing he does after entering the "strange" room is to straighten the pictures hanging on the wall. Coincidence? King wrote The Gunslinger in 1982, and worked on the other story, 1408, some time later...I don't have an exact date nailed down for you, but it was definitely later on. Just something I thought you guys would enjoy. Ciao
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LU6.2 writes:
I have always enjoyed Stephen King's references to his other books. The link between Deloris Claiborne and Gerald's Game is that the characters in each novel are in the path of totality of the same eclipse at the same time. One of my favorite references is in Pet Semetary, when the wife is rushing home from visiting her parents, having a feeling something is wrong, she drives past a freeway exit for the town of 'Salem's Lot, and has a bad feeling about it.
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Bishop writes:
He does this quite often- in Needful things, the sherrif (forgot his name) mentions that he has gotten over the incident with Thad from 'the dark Half'. The main reason he does this is because most of his novels are set in the same area (Maine) and it creates a sort of 'town history' if you will that absorbs (me at least) most readers into his wold.
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RalphB writes:
Speaking of Castle Rock, its radio station WCAS is mentioned on two of SK's latest. Trisha, in The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, listens to WCAS for its broadcasts of Red Sox games. In Dreamcatcher, the men in the hunting cabin also listen to WCAS because it is the only radio station they can get, and only just barely. Interestingly, there is a real WCAS - it is associated with MIT in Cambridge, MA.
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Casey writes:
In the "Low Men In Yellow Coats" portion of Hearts In Atlantis Ted and Bobby are confronted by the Low Men. In the ensuing conversation Ted makes references to the gunslinger and the towers in The Dark Towers series. Ted most come from that world.
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sonic_death writes:
In Bag of Bones, the main character in the book Mike Noonan is writing in the last half is named Ray Garraty, who is also the main character in The Long Walk, one of the Bachman books. That makes Garraty a character in a book that is a reference to a character in a book written by a character in a career.
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Sniper writes:
There is another reference in Misery, which takes place in Colorado. Somewhere in the middle of the book, there is told about somebody who went to Colorado to go to the Overlook Hotel ('The Shining')
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Celeborn writes:
This may be a false memory, so please feel free to correct me: in the movie "IT" when Henry Bowers leaves the mental hospital on his way to try to kill Mike, is there not a 1958 Plymouth waiting to give him a ride? It has been a while since I've seen the movie, and this is not mentioned in "IT." Does anyone else recall this? Also, one reference that no one has mentioned, from "Wizards and Glass": When Roland and the group dis-embark from Blaine the Mono, they enter a deserted station. They get a newspaper that tells about Captain Trips taking over the world. They have entered the world of "The Stand." And keep in mind that this is still another world, one that has Takuro Spirit cars. Having read all of of King's books (several times) sometimes I will go nuts trying to verify a cross-reference. Sometimes this is just bad memory on my part, but I have found some very subtle things that King does.
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t2qwazyfox writes:
Stephen King often "plagiarizes" himself in his books. I agree that "Hearts in Atlantis" is a good indication of what is coming. (Could it be that the "Dark Tower" series will be finished?) Interestingly though, the last section in "Hearts in Atlantis is called "Blind Willie". "Blind Willie" is actually a short story from a book he wrote called "Six Stories". There are only 1100 numbered copies of this book printed, but I don't believe it can be bought in a bookstore. Although I haven't closely compared them, both versions of this story are similar. I submitted more detailed information to triviastic.com.
8 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
DrDopey writes:
Bag of Bones also touches on a couple of his other books, most notably Insomnia and the Castle Rock books. He talks to the guy from Insomnia (Ralph?) when he's in the cafe and has a rather interesting conversation. Also, at the end of the book Sheriff Pangborn from Needful Things and other books stops in to talk to Mike Noonan and Mike asks him how Polly is doing. I just get a real kick out of this stuff.
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Brittany writes:
In Needful Things, when Ace gets into Mr. Gaunt's new car, he smells the new car smell and thinks "there's no better smell in the world, except maybe for..." This is a memorable line from "Christine."
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chuk writes:
Even Stephen King's wife, Tabitha, gets in on this. At least one of her books mentions in passing something that happened in one of his. Her stuff is really good, too, although not usually horror-type stuff.
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MoonBaby writes:
To Casey, I know what you're talking about. He says something about either the Tower itself, Roland or the Crimson King. I remembered when I read it that i figured Ted must come from Roland's world. Did "Hearts in Atlantis" confuse anyone else? I didn't really understand it all too well. It was a good book and all but I didn't see the main point to it.
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L84SA writes:
Has anyone noticed the connection in "Rose Madder" to "Misery?" The romance novels Rose and Anna read are part of the 'Misery' series, by Paul Sheldon, who is also the writer in "Misery."
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pammie writes:
Another good reference is in "The Dead Zone" where some of the kids are getting freaked out by Johnny and one of the girls says something like, He's like that girl from that movie Carrie which as you all know was Stephen King's first novel later made into a movie.
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Yeah, I thought of that when I read The Stand, before that I had read The Eyse Of The Dragon, where the "bad guy" was named Flagg, just as in The Stand. I really like that sort of references.
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Zpyder writes:
In Needful things when the shopkeeper gets a woman to go and burry some stuff in a abandoned house garden, there's a reference to like a ghost of cujo up in the barn, red eyes glowing there, she scrams like hell when she's finished !
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Jack writes:
When King had his brush with death I believe this accelerated what he has dreamed of doing. In his Dark Tower series he has created an existence where he can bring all of his creative works together in one final climatic battle against evil. In the tower I believe we will see all of his evil characters portrayed either as a composite or a shift changing entities and the granddaddy of all battles against evil will commence. The Tower will be a world few of us can imagine with time shifts, altered realities, and indescribable evil--equivalant in some respects to Dante's Inferno. King owns little glimpse into hell where all of his previous works become sub-plots to this climatic battle. It will make the Stand seem tame by comparison. The question is whether after he publishes the final book in the Dark Tower series (and it will be a very long one I'm sure) will he continue writing under the pen name of King or will he assume another pen name and spend his golden years creating works in which he makes no reference to his earlier books. Jack
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RiffRaff1138 writes:
Not one of King's own references per se, but very close: King wrote a story called "The Lawnmower Man", which can be found in the book Night Shift. However, you may or may not know that there is also a movie that was inspired by this story (A surprising fact, seeing as how the only thing they have in common is the TITLE!). In the movie, the Lawnmower Man, Jobe, is a simpleton gardener who becomes a genius thanks to his friend Dr. Angelo, who works for (and here's the reference) a government agency known as "The Shop". Hmm, have we maybe seen this "Shop" someplace before?
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In It at the beginning of part 3 chapter 3 it says to find ben you go to the little town of gatlin, isn't gatlin the town in childrin of the corn.
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El Pupitre writes:
Also, in Bag of Bones, the main character Michael Noonan makes reference to William Denbrough, who is the main character of another one of King's novels, It.
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Dan writes:
Alot of his cross reference also has to do that alot of his novels are based in the same town, or outlying towns to the fantasy "Maine" he created. If you have read alot of SK's books, you will know alot of them are based out of the town called Castle Rock, I believe, so a woman telling her daughter watch out for Frank Dodd is a nice way to show how alot of his books are linked, like a continuing series. Pretty schweet.
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I Have read most of Stephen Kings books. The character, cynthia in gerald's game is also in regulators and desperation. also there is another Castle rock story in "the sun dod" short story from nightmares and dreamscapes.
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DcnFrost writes:
Also in "Bag of Bones" there is a slight reference to "The Dark Half" where the character of Thad Beaumont is mentioned that have committed suicide, wonder if there will ever be a follow up on that considering "The Dark Half" seemed to have a mostly happy ending.
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yoda22278 writes:
Go read "The Body" by King (it became the movie Stand By Me). It can be found in the Different Seasons collection. In there Cujo is mentioned in a very brief manner. Almost as an afterthought.
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Torgo writes:
In Night Shift: The two stories- Jerusalems' Lot and One For the Road deal with Salems' Lot Night Surf is about teens dealing with the aftermath of Captain Trips- The Stand.
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In Misery, Annie frequently visits Sidewander, a town mentioned in The Shining, and when she is talking about her murder victims, she says one was submitting drawings to a magazine featuring an article on the Overlook hotel (for the shining) and how the crazy grounds keeper blew it up.
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Dirty D writes:
In Tommyknockers at the very end. It makes reference to a group of goverment personel coming in from some place in Virginia called "The Shop". And how it's main complex was rumored to be destroyed by a very young female pyrotechinic. (I am paraphrasing) Also, I have noticed reference in everybook he has written to some other book. I can't remember where, but I remember a reference to Christine in at least one book. ( Salem's Lot maybe?)
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Torgo writes:
The character Cynthia Smith(with the orange and green hair) from Desperation and The Regulators was also in Rose Madder, she was staying at Daughters and Sisters, and had her nose broken by Norm Daniels(Rose's ex)...She tells Steve about these events after he picks her up hitch-hiking in Desperation, in Desperation she is going back to her family after leaving Daughters and Sisters.
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sherlock writes:
I'm pretty sure that in "Bag of Bones" (maybe when he's in key largo??), SK also make a reference to the main character from "Insomnia". I can't recall it, does anyone else?
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cpr writes:
Carrie's mom worked at the Blue Ribbon laundry mat on the mangler which is from a short story from graveyard shift
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toness86 writes:
In "Tommy knockers" there is a reference to "dead zone" I am not sure where but I remember reading it. it says something like i heard about a man in some town that went into a coma and when he came out he could tell the future about someone's life after they touched him.
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Kat450 writes:
Also in Insomnia, besides being set in Derry and everything that entails, the Crimson King is mentioned by Ed Deepneau. Later, in The Black House, the Crimson King and the Dark Tower are both mentioned (Tower and Beam, probably more but I'm not done reading it)
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Heggers writes:
Stephen King is a GENIUS! I love reading all this stuff about his interconnecting themes. I haven't read all his books, but I just finished The Regulators, so I'm on a SK high! Just a comment - the main character in Gerald's Game? Her name was Jessie. ~*~HeAtHeR*~*
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Torgo writes:
In 'The Body' King references Cujo(I think during the junkyard scene) King's short story The Night Flier's lead character is reporter Rick Dees, he was in The Dead Zone. A more recent and obvious one is in Dark Tower 5:Wolves of Calla, where we meet Father Callahan from Salems' Lot(and he even gives an account of what happened to him after Lot)
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Mark writes:
I haven't read the Shawshank Redemption, but I did see the movie of it last night, and something clicked. In a very early scene, Red (Morgan Freeman) is asked how he is (or something) and his reply is, "Same ol' sh*t, deifferent day". If you've read Dreamcatcher or seen the film, you'll know what I'm talking about. Funnily enough, I saw the Dreamcatcher yesterday, too, but earlier in the day.
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Steel-Taz writes:
Of course the cross referencing is done on purpose as well as the so called sub-conscience (as twisted and as demented as his my be lol) familiarities between his stories. Ive been a avid, or as Stephen would put it a "constant reader", for many years. There are so many references that jump back and forth, too and from, that I think it would be awesome to learn form The Master himself, of all those golden nuggets of intertwining trivia, and just how each one relates. But that kind spoils the fun of traveling through the macarbe adventure filled towns, whether that be Castle Rock, Jerusalem's Lot, Las Vegas, Denver "Kala-raid-doh". The beautiful part is it opens this vast world of the strange and scarey (at times), horrific and tantalizing world the King has invited us to visit with him. From simple curiosity (The Tommy Knockers) digging up a hunk of metal, to an all out government mistake (The Stand), from demonic machines (Trucks, Christine, The Mangler etc.) to demonic life forms in mans clothing (The Darkman(The Stand, Leland Gaunt(Needful Things), Linoge(Storm of the Century), Jack Torrence(The Shining), to the heros being just kids, Charlie Mcgee(Fire Starter), Trisha McFarland(The girl who loved Tom Gorgon), Vampires(Salem's Lot), even Clowns(It). All to feed our frenzied minds as we travel on this journey into these towns that exist only in the mind of Stephen King. I for one would love to see an amusement park constructed and built with "Kings World" in mind. Universal Studios would pale in comparison. But Steve if you do ever read these words(I know fat chance) I would like to just say a simple "Thank You" for the (so far) 30 year journey.
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Rob writes:
actually, those two books were ready for release at the same time and were meant to be released in one volume (sort of like a 2-part "different seasons") but King's publisher thought making them 2 separate books would be better for sales and also thought that the link between them was a little tenuous to warrant pairing the two. so the linking material was trimmed to just the barest allusion and the books were released individually with a gap in the release dates so as to avoid competing against each other.
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brenando writes:
A very interesting thing about the cross-reference is that it happens in the MIDDLE PAGES of both books. When I read "Gerald's Game" for the first time, before I read "Delores Clairborne", and got to the mentioned part, I just had to check in "Delores", so I searched the middle pages, and there it was. About the plots in Maine: Stephen King created a town in Maine, named "Castle Rock" and played with it for years. The town's "beggining", though not the first mentioning in King's books, is in the short story "The Body". After many years, King decided the poor town has had enough, and decided to annihilate it in "Needful Things". And yes, he lives in Maine.
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vrf3 writes:
Another reason why this happens (and it is possible that some of it SK just does unconsciously!) is if you look at the dates at the end of each of his books (I'm not sure but I think he began doing this with Pet Sematary) the dates overlap. These dates indicate the period in which he wrote the book, so you can see that he writes one or two (sometimes more!) books at the same time so it's just normal for him to have the details of the books he's writing....
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Salvo writes:
Toness86 has reason: in "Tommyknockers" there's a reference to Johnny Smith, protagonist of "The Dead Zone", that were in coma and then he could save himself from it. Stephen King describes him telling the gesture of touching the temples...
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Anthony writes:
In the Stand, The Shop from firestarter was who was assigned to deal with the captain trips outbreak in the begining. In insomnia, after the main character was stabbed by that crazy guy, he talked with one of the major characters in It, I think his name was Mike Hanlon. Also in insomnia, one of the characters, probably Atrophos, mentioned that shape changing was a tradition in Derry, a reference to how It was always changing shape.
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allie001 writes:
OK, this is driving me crazy! I just started reading Hearts in Atlantis, the only Stephen King book I haven't read already. I can already see the obvious connections to The Dark Tower, but there is one scene driving me mad trying to recall where I read it before. It is the part where Bobby wins the game of three card monte. I know I've read a very similar scene, but my memory must be bad cause I can't think of which book it was in. Can anyone please name the book, even better name it and describe the scene??? I think I remember the guy who did the same thing in the other story (the one I can't remember) was with a woman he was dating, they were at a carnival and I think she got sick. Please help me I'm going out of my mind trying to remember!
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Tux writes:
Yeah, there was a character in Desperation from Rose Madder, Cynthia I think. He creates a sorta Cthulhu/H. P. Lovecraft-type world, only INSIDE Maine. Weird that.
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Sruffy, yes they make two refrences to Cujo (in my opinion) on where he talks about the dog becoming rabid (think he even says "Lots of rabies going round now, one dog got it a couple years back down south. Real bad Cujo, if you know what i'm talking about" in my copy) and then when he talks about the dog coming back from the dead ("We buried his dog there, it came back, but it was... diffrent)
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daniel writes:
He does this in most of his books there is almost always, if just the smallest reference to another book of his keep reading dark tower series has tons trough out all the books
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Zhaan writes:
This was intentional. The two books were made for each other, because the girl in 'Gerald's Game' saw Delores and Delores saw her in 'Dolores Claiborne'. Also, near the end of 'Dolores' Dolores mentions that the day before she knew that the little girl she had seen was grown up and in trouble. That was when that girl had been handcuffed to the bed and that crazy guy was going to kill her.
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Graen writes:
If you actually read through them, almost all of his books tie together, especially through the Dark Tower series. If you want to know the whole story, of course, you need to read all of the books. Coincidentally, all his books written by Richard Bachman, (except possibly The Regulators) are completely independent of the main story.
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JopieBK writes:
Yet another cross-reference, though one of the more subtle ones. It links two stories about Salem's Lot: A short story from one of the collections; the other the novel. The short story centers around a book of evil magic (The Book of the Wyrm, I think?), bound in human skin. In the novel two children break into a disused house. While they're in there the girl comes across a book and when she touches it, she thinks it feels like something familiar but can't figure out what. Then they're disturbed and the book's never mentioned again, but the implication is this is the book from the other story. I haven't read the novel for years and the part with the children might have been in a second Salem's Lot story, so I'd appreciate someone checking this out. It definitely exists though, and is quite a clever little link when you find it!
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Phut writes:
In Carrie she blows up a gas station. Teddy's Amoco. It says Teddy Duchamp (from The Body) has been dead since 1968 and his son runs the station. Don't recall what book tells us how he dies. Also in Carrie there is mention at two points of a "beam" and Carries last name is White (the coming of the white) and she is doused in red pig blood (the crimson king). Several books establish the White/Red concept I think. BTW STEPHEN KING RULES !!
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Kym writes:
Also in in the Tommyknockers movie one women comments how a dog is acting strange. "He's acting like a regular Cujo". I don't know if that is in the book because i haven't read it.
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Hessian13 writes:
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scruffycat writes:
I haven't read the book for years, but doesn't the older neighbour in Pet Sematary mention some of the events in Cujo ? Or am I talking gibberish!
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Jade writes:
Scruffycat-You're thinking of the story the neighbor tells Creed about the dog he had as a child. The dog was killed and he buried it in the pet cemetery and it came back evil. The dog acted a lot like Cujo did, but it wasn't a reference to Cujo.
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MarcelS. writes:
Someone mentioned that Carrie's mom worked at the Blue Ribbon laundry. Wasn't that where the main character worked in Road Work (Bachman Books)?
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bcl_kami writes:
I thought that the majority of King's books were set in the city of Derry, Maine. am I just skipping over the ones that are set in other places?
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