Army of Darkness Easter Egg - Klaatu Barada Nikto

In order to destroy the book of the dead, the hero must memorise and say the words "Klaatu barada nikto" This is a tribute to The Day the Earth Stood Still. In that movie the alien instructs the girl to memorise and say the codewords "Klaatu barada nikto" to stop the robot from attacking.

Spread the word and if you like this Egg!
User Rating:
6.9
  6.9/10 with 201 votes
Contributed By: Brendan on 10-10-1999
Reviewed By: Webmaster
Special Requirements: listen to the magic words
Please correct this Egg if you see errors.

Pictures and Videos

None posted yet. Send us yours and be the first!

Comments

ningyo writes:
As I recall, in 'The Day the Earth Stood Still' the interstellar robot-cop was named "Gort", the Alien visitor (Michael Rennie) introduces himself as "Klaatu" (check the spelling in the Internet Movie Database). He instructs a terrified Helen Benson (Patricia Neal) to say the phrase - "if anything should happen to him"... he died, she told the words to Gort, Gort brings him back to life, Earth is impressed, guns stop. Maybe they mean: "Gort, Klaatu - alive - is not " or "Gort, [stop] Klaatu being dead" because they resemble faux real words nikto=nix (not) b[v]arada=alive. Also didn't the 70's-80's satire band the Tubes use the phrase too??? as part of their stage-set??
33 of 46 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Sheila writes:
According to the shooting script for AoD, the words spoken are actually "Clatto Verata Nicto."
28 of 37 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
wess writes:
Many references (many of them mirrors, duplicates, or just repeats) give either "Klaatu Barada Nicto" or "Klaatu Verada Nicto" (with some occasional differences in spelling, but the above are the most common). While I haven't yet determined if "V" or "B" is correct, I think that the fact they are next to each other on the typewriter is not the reason--It would not account for the large number of different matching references. What is probably more likely is that "V" and "B" are nearly identical sounds phonetically: Both are "voiced" consonants, the only difference being that "B" is a "labial" consonant and "V" a "labio-dental" consonant. While in English we consider them different sounds, they are nearly the same in some other languages. ** As for "Klaatu", I do not have a definitive reference, but I find that the older references almost universally give this spelling, and that other spellings do not appear to emerge until much later. (As much as I love them personally, I cannot suggest the Canadian band Klaatu as a reliable reference point, however.) ** As for the script to Army of Darkness, I would point out that it postdates the original film by decades, and as much as I very much enjoy AoD, let's be honest enough to admit that it is not exactly the work of a Spielberg; the point being, it's probably not a reliable reference. I suggest the writers simply wrote in a phonetic version of what they remembered from The Day the Earth Stood Still.
18 of 24 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Actually, it's Gort Klattu Verada Nikto. Nikto should be pronounced two instead of toe. I've got a shirt from The Day the Earth Stood Still with 'em on the back.. Great movie.
17 of 23 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Velnich writes:
He isn't supposed to say the words to destroy the book anyways. Saying the words stops bad stuff from happening. Merlin guy needs the book.
11 of 17 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Pyrotechnic writes:
Just another FYI thing for anyone who cares, I was watching an old Ninja Turtles tape one day for sh*ts and giggles, the one where they meet up with aliens from another dimension, and the aliens' names in that episode are "Klatu" "Verata" and "Nikto"....I just thought that was funny.
11 of 18 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
WULFRYDAR writes:
Despite common buoyancies between opinions or even researched "facts?", the assembled logic represents this; Klaatu is a derivative of Latin-based descent but with no direct translation, GORT is a supremely intelligent protection for Klaatu's work. Klaatu is the mediator and GORT is the logical RPG. As far as the phrase, loosely set at 'Klaatu Barada Nikto', more originally phonetic as 'Clahtoo Vorada Niktow' can be assessed many ways. "Klaatu" represents the origin of the command, "Barada" represents the action of the ultimatum, and "Nikto" represents the ultimatum of the action. Loosely; "Klaatu speaks Rescind!" GORT acknowledges this command for that it is spoken in its native programmed language. "Vorada" represents 'voracious destruction' and 'Nikto' represents the recinding of an act or action. In other-other words "your sentient (Klaatu) demands that your actions of obliteration (Vorada) be terminated and rescinded at once (Nikto)!!! Hope this clarifies...
5 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
geronimo writes:
It's actually Klattu "Varada" Nickto. Check your closed captioning.
12 of 21 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
And no, it isn't latin. Film makers in those days just used whatever the heck they wanted. Such as in Lost in Space? The numbers on the Allen's spaceship (original TV show here people) are IA some silly number. Well, IA stands for Irwin Allen, the shows producer/scriptwriter/director, and the number was 20th Century Fox's telephone number.
9 of 15 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
NecroMan writes:
The words are not of any human origin. Often in movies creators make up languages(Star Wars & George Lucas). In a famous alien book I read it means that Gort's owner is dead in his native programmed language. It has been about five years since I last saw The Day the Earth Stood Still.
7 of 11 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
zanneliza writes:
Just an added FYI--the same words (spelling-Klatu Barada Nikto) are used in an extremely funny play "The Foreigner" by Larry Shue. The words are spoken by a character pretending to be an "alien" so I assume it's a reference to "The Day the Earth Stood Still"
6 of 10 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Klaatu writes:
** See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necronomicon Hoax History. Fantasy horror writer H.P. Lovecraft invents a name from a dream. The first time the word Necronomicon is ever seen in print is in H.P. Lovecraft's 1924 short story "The Hound" written in 1922. He had to "create" it into existence after that: but he never did. Why? He died. He then mentions it in "The History Of The Necronomicron" written in 1927 and published in 1938 after his death. He alludes to the real author as "The Mad Arab" Abdul Alhazred. This invention is based on "The Greater Key of Solomon" See: "Secret Lore of Magic" - Idries Shaw. See: "The Magus" - Sir Francis Barret. There is no Necronomicon. Lovecraft only mentioned it: he never created it. He dies. Then later. ** "The line between fact and fiction was further blurred in the late 1970s when a book purporting to be a translation of the "real Necronomicon" was published. This book, by the pseudonymic "Simon", had little connection to the fictional Lovecraft Mythos but instead was based on Sumerian mythology. It was later dubbed the "Simon Necronomicon". ** A blatant hoax version of the Necronomicon, edited by George Hay, appeared in 1978 and included an introduction by the paranormal researcher and writer Colin Wilson. David Langford described how the book was prepared from a computer analysis of a discovered "cipher text" by Dr. John Dee. The resulting "translation" was in fact written by occultist Robert Turner, but it was far truer to the Lovecraftian version than the Simon text and even incorporated quotations from Lovecraft's stories in its passages." That's right. The 1970's black book you bought in the store is a fictional construct based on a fictional reference of a fictional book based upon other sources. That book you just bought: Lovecraft never saw. The book he mentions: never existed. It is a complex hoax spanning many years. Everytime someone else references it - the myth grows. Sorry. Were you silly enough to think you too could raise netherworldly entities to get you that recording contract? :-) It is interesting to note that the Klaatu phrase has words similar to the Lovecraft Sumerian "Dieties." I am still searching for actual Sumerian word pronunciations. It is also interesting to note the similarity between the "Keep The Monster Crisis From Escaping" theme of both H.P. Lovecraft's works and the movie "The Day the Earth Stood Still." Buy the Movie "The Dunwich Horror" 1969 derived from 1929 book based on the "Necronomicon"'s popularity. The magician in the movie steals necronimicon from the town museum, guess which book is on the alter, which book calls the Dunwich Horror? That whole "alter scene" was in the movie "Army of Darkness." I canít remember what the spells were. I am sure they were in Latin though. I donít think they used the Klaatu phrase. What about that "Klaatu is Beatles" thing also.
5 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Klaatu writes:
KLAATU BARADA NIKTO Kal-la-Tu Bar-AD-DA NI-TU Barren-desert outside-shout-with self-to be Empty-desert Thing-interference -to be -to interfer http://www.sumerian.org/sumcvc.htm It is Sumerian. If it is, I have the translation. It would make sense if it was Sumerian. Think about it. My translation is, "Gort,interfer with making outside a desert." Klaatu's name is not personel like Gort's. I believe Klaatu was Gort's servant. This makes sense on several levels. Klaatu is part of the destruction mission and Gort's race are the destroyers. Klaatu is the "humanoid ambassador." This was part two.
8 of 14 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
KenDaLL WoLf writes:
OK the script says Varada. i have it right here. Actually tho, the script is a lot different than the actual movie, because it was not meant to be funny. It was supposed to be more serious and violent, but I am glad they changed it, because it just would not be the same without "this is my BOOM stick!!"
6 of 11 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Mortarion writes:
Klaatu and nickto are both characters from Star Wars as well.
5 of 11 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
miskatonic writes:
The book that the words go with is the Necronomicon. HP Lovecraft mentions it several times in his books. Miskatonic
7 of 15 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Shiz writes:
Actually the necronomicon/'the book of the dead' is the brainchild of horror writer HP Lovecraft and thus NOT real
6 of 13 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Another FYI the words Clatto Verada Nictu are used by the little wizard in Willow...thats something to do with bringing the "Chosen one" back to life...maybe there is something in the Klattu is dead meaning to the words...does the Sumarian Language actually exist...?
3 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
michael romo writes:
hp Lovecraft frequently mentioned the necronomicon in his books .dont see the movie read the books . i love the lovecraft movies but they definitely miss a lot of the cthulu mythos.necronomicon was probably formed from three words necro nom and icon roughly dead name and icon which i guess would roughly translate into the book of the dead. what i have said is not perfect possibly someone else could break it down better..i have noticed a lot of movies since and before aod that mention this phrase.
1 of 3 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
annigurl writes:
You know I am a huge Sam Rammi fan- especially when he works with Bruce Campbell... I have noticed over the years that this magical phrase is used A LOT in TV and movies... Even the short lived Honey I Shrunk the Kids TV series and certain cartoons!
2 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Khan Krum writes:
I found this: "The Nikto character, like fellow characters Barada and Klaatu, were named after the 1951 science fiction classic, The Day the Earth Stood Still. In that film, Klaatu, the man from outer space, says the cryptic alien phrase, "Klaatu, Barada, Nikto" in order to control the giant robot, Gort." Source: www.starwars.com
3 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Light writes:
I have to venture to guess that Klaatu Varata Nictu must mean something like "Shut your eyes block the insanity" or "Don't blink or you'll miss the truth". Bummer. Some things just aren't easy... Nicto would be something to do with the eyes, Klaatu would originally (long ago) be with a C and would mean "block". The only reference I can find for Verata is some odd herbal for insanity ( named for the ailment probably ) or "verily/truth". Counterpoints and lots of criticism are very welcome.
4 of 10 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
ThorTheGod writes:
BTW The "hero"'s name was Ash.
2 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
michael romo writes:
i notice someone says the book in thirteen ghosts cannot be the right book as it is the wrong size.movies are fiction always.please note in real life there are at least three versions of this book ..the softbound which many of you are probably familiar with and two hardbound editions the hardbound in leather of which their were 666 copies signed by someone i don't remember because it has been awhile since i have seen my limited edition of three thousand which has black standard binding and occult symbols on it i know it is not real but it has real elements and it makes a great prop for scaring people. it looks nothing like the book in either AOD or check out equinox which also featured the necronomicon and probably inspired the entire evil dead series.
0 of 2 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
benteen writes:
The words from "The Day The Earth Stood Still" are "Klaatu Borada Nikto". I just watched "Army of Darkness" again tonight, and sure enough, the soundtrack sure as hell sounds more like "verada" than "borada". I wonder what the script actually said, and why (if they substituted "verada" for "borada") the change was made.
1 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Poodlefaker writes:
Gort Klattu Verada Nikto - is how I remember it in the film when it first came out - (it got me hooked on Sci Fi) Pity no-one knows what it's supposed to mean. Maybe some smart person can re-arrange the letters and come up with something really clever! He who causes riots is correct I think.
2 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Anticlea writes:
About "the foreigner" reference mentioned by someone else- the reason its said is because the character (I forget his name and we did the play last semester!) was the editor of a sci fi magazine that had done a spread on The Day the Earth Stood Still. Earlier reference in the play was given when he tells Froggy that his main conserns revolve around the spelling of Klatuu Verada Nikto. (Watching Mike attempt to pronounce that was hysterical.) Our professor picked the play mainly for those two lines being in there- he's an absolute Brue Campbell fan.
1 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
ARNHIEM writes:
maybe cause v is next to b on the keyboard and the closed captionist messed up? always a possibility!
1 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
that one guy writes:
Barada was the name of a Weequay on Jabba's Sail Barge in Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi.
2 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
jon breen writes:
Has anyone watched Friday the 13th: Jason goes to hell? In that film the VERY same book (the Necronomicon) is in Jasons house; a huy picks it up ans it is not all that difficult to notice.
1 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
First, the direct quote from the movie: Clatto Verata Nicto. Second, the book in Thirteen Ghosts is not the Necronomicon. It is too big and has a different name.
3 of 10 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
To O Mega writes:
Hmm. As far as The Book of the Dead, it is NOT the Necronomicon. The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian set of spells that a dead person was supposed to recite to the different gods on his/her way to the Western lands. The Necronomicon was an invention of HP Lovecraft, later to be made up as some sort of pseudo-Sumerian grimoire. As far as the phrase Klaatu Barada Nikto goes, I remember seeing it spelled as such in the 80's, years before AoD. It might have been altered due to honest fudging OR due to copyright problems.
4 of 12 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Bond007 writes:
its Klatu Verata Nictu, its a code for cheat options in Sim City 2000 Network Edition
4 of 13 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
bene writes:
RE: Sim City 2000 cheat code Many Sim City references are spelled wrong. Some of the neighboring cities are named after characters from Blake's 7 and Red Dwarf, but they are completely mangled and only make sense phonetically.
1 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
liquid-trust writes:
Umm, Guys...Is it a bad thing that I have a copy of the Necronomican at my dads? I dont know about the whole skin and blood thing, but its a fairly large book and its been in my closet for ages...
1 of 9 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
LadyCat01 writes:
The Necronomican was also in the movie "Thirteen Ghosts" and it was supposed to be used to free the ghosts. It is supposed to be a real artifact.
0 of 9 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
Gune writes:
The Necronomicon has been used in so many things that it would take days to list them all. I'm not sure about the words but the book was real. It really was written around the 7th century AD. Wether or not it was bound in human skin and written in blood is unknown, because the original was "supposedly" destroyed.
1 of 13 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No
The Necronomicon is said to be a real book, an ancient Arabic text, not by HP Lovecraft. Some call the Lucifer's book a book of the damned only 401 were published well before Lovecraft's career. There are several accounts of people haveing run ins with this book, as soon as they pick it up a cold chill runs down their spine, it isn't a book that should be sought after. It is a book that goes against God. There is a website that goes into detail of the evils of the necronomicon, that is where I have gotten most of my info. A word of advice (Don't go looking for evil)........www.geosites.com/SoHo/9879/necpage.htm
1 of 14 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No


Register - Privacy Policy - About Us - Contact Us