Pratchett, Terry Easter Egg - Sod 'Em All

In 'Under milk wood' by Dillan Thomas, the town name is 'Llareggub' - backwards, this is BUGGERALL (BUGGER ALL)
In 'Soul music', Imp y Celen is from 'Llamedos' - backwards is SODEMALL (SOD EM ALL)
Good hey!!!!

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Contributed By: sam on 02-02-2000
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Special Requirements: have read pratchett books i.e. 'Soul music'
Please correct this Egg if you see errors.

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Comments

Jonathan writes:
Apparently, there is a place in Wales called Llaregub (I can't remember whether it has one or two g's). Also, the famous battle of Koom Valley comes from the Welsh word Cwm, pronounced Koom, and meaning Valley. Koom valley translates as Valley Valley. This is in reference to Torpenhow Hill, somewhere in the UK, which translates as Hillhillhill Hill!!
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Fred Chook writes:
Apparently Llamedos is the Discworldian Wales. 'Apparently', as I know nothing about Wales and this is second-hand information. So... XXXX would have a state called New Rimwards Llamedos?
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hawse writes:
XXXX or "Four-ecks" (as its also known is obviously a reference to Australia). There used to be an advert for Castlemaine XXXX (beer) on British TV (possibly other places too??) that said... "Australians wouldn't give a Castlemaine XXXX [four X]" for anything else. For fellow brits: "I think we've overdone it with the sherry..."
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@ssKicker writes:
Sort of, yeah. I didn't know you hadn't heard of it. It's just like,"F*** 'em all", or any other swear word you want to use.
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adj writes:
Cwm does mean valley - in *Welsh*. As an *English* word it has the technical sense in geology, but not in Welsh. Cwm Rhondda is not a cirque! Oh and by the way, sod is a fixed abbreviation of sodomise - bugger. Llamedos is therefore an exact equivalent of Llaregyb, and is subtlely different from *Llamekcuf (and easier to pronounce). Pob hwyl
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http://www.lspace.org/books/apf/index.html That site has all eggs listed here. Please go there instead of posting here. Thank you.
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lukeskydiver writes:
Cwm doesn't mean valley. A cwm is a cirque which is a hole carved out of a mountain by a forming glacier which is found at the head of a glacial valley.
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zesus writes:
The XXXX reference would not be about New South Wales. If anything it would be about Queensland where the beer XXXX is brewed in Brisbane. The name XXXX was originally to show its strength.
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ferret writes:
Fred Chook was merely making a joke, and a rather sophisticated one at that. Seems it past right over most of you people's heads. There is no connection between Llamedos and XXXX in the book, although I wouldn't be surprised at there being on in the future should Terry ever see this.
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Ash writes:
I would think it would be something less scathing than the F word. Bugger off seems to be the perfect synonym, insulting without being obscene.
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dogg_lad writes:
I also like the place names: Bugrup (bugger up), Didjebringabeeralong (Did you bring a beer along. I probably spelled it wrong), Badass (Fairly self explanatory) and Djelibeibi (Jelly Baby) I just think they're pretty cool.
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Puntino writes:
Yes it means bugger them all.
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actually writes:
"Llamedos" seems to be some kind of tribute to Dylan Thomas' radio play, *Under Milk Wood*. It's set in the fictional Welsh village of Llaregyb, which was originally going to be 'Llaregub,' only Thomas didn't want to be offending those dire little old Welsh ladies. And why would he be offending them? 'Llaregub' is, as has been mentioned, 'bugger all' spelt backwards.
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Casquivana writes:
This must be a British thing ... what's "sod 'em all" mean, anyway? Is that the same as bu*ger all?
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Nishkers writes:
XXXX has nothing to do with anything even in the Northern Hemisphere.... XXXX is Australia. Go read The Lost Continent.... good book.
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I think the XXXX reference is to one of the australian states - new south wales!!
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dogg_lad writes:
Sod 'em all is shorthand for 'sod them all' which basically means f*ck them all but in a less offensive British way.
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